Feria from Malaga

Feria from Malaga

Malaga fair, feria and fiestas in Malaga SpainThe annual Malaga fair in August is an exuberant week-long street party with plenty of flamenco and ‘fino'(sherry).The fair commemorates the re-conquest of the city by Isabella and Ferdinand in 1487 and lasts for ten full festive days.
he following day the people take to the streets, the women in flouncy flamenco dresses, to dance, drink and, generally, make merry. There is patent rivalry between the two main Andalusian cities, Seville and Malaga – especially when it comes to festivities. In April, Seville boasts the illumination of something like 500,000 lights for the inauguration of the town’s massive annual fair. In true competitive spirit, Malaga strives to go one better and in 2004 it was reported that they nearly hit the half million mark – and so the one-upmanship goes on. This Festival of light by night is just one aspect of the ‘Feria de Málaga’.
The inaugural night of the Fair is launched with the traditional ‘Pregón de la Feria’ (opening address) read out from the Town Hall balcony, followed, on the strike of midnight, by an awe-inspiring fireworks display. This ‘Big Bang’ is a magnificent show of Malaga’s muscle in the party prowess department and is best appreciated from Malaga Port, where thousands gather vying for a privileged view of this magical scene.

This city fair is concentrated around Malaga’s equivalent to London’s Bond Street – Marques de Larios which is decorated with paper lanterns and flags and where horses replace cars as the means of transport. Millions of people visit the fair, although very few tourists seem to even know about this intrinsically Andalusian traditional fiesta which, in Malaga, is two distinct events, in the centre during the day and at the fairground from around 9 pm until dawn.
The latter is an immense precinct where various associations install their ‘casetas’ – large booths for entertainment and refreshment, where old and young alike meet up in laughing gossiping circles, surrounded by swirling dancers and waiters rushing around tripping over babies and young children and making sure that everyone is continually topped up with fino and ‘tapas’.

The traditional dance of Andalucia is called ‘Sevillanas’ comprising four distinct dances with plenty of finger-clicking, foot-stomping and, above all, feeling. This is where ‘dancing in the street’ can be appreciated spontaneously ‘en vida’ which is really the only way Spanish dancing should be performed.

The annual Malaga fair in August is an exuberant week-long street party with plenty of flamenco and ‘fino'(sherry).The fair commemorates the re-conquest of the city by Isabella and Ferdinand in 1487 and lasts for ten full festive days.

he following day the people take to the streets, the women in flouncy flamenco dresses, to dance, drink and, generally, make merry. The traditional dance of Andalucia is called ‘Sevillanas’ comprising four distinct dances with plenty of finger-clicking, foot-stomping and, above all, feeling. This is where ‘dancing in the street’ can be appreciated spontaneously ‘en vida’ which is really the only way Spanish dancing should be performed. Come to learn Spanish and Flamenco danse!

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