What to Visit in Malaga

What to Visit in Malaga

Malaga-Spain_01 Malaga city is packed with charm, atmosphere and authenticity. Málaga’s coastline forms part of The Costa del Sol, a special part of the Mediterranean — so you are in for a treat during your stay in Malaga. The climate is temperate, with an average of 86°F during the summer months and 64°F during winter. This is due to the mountains that protect the coast from cold north winds.

What do you can visit in Málaga:

Museo Picasso Malaga – Museo Picasso Malaga is the city’s most renowned museum.

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La Alcazaba is a Malaga landmark that dates back to the 700s. The entrance, known as Christ’s Door or Puerta del793-114 Cristo, is where the first mass was celebrated after the Christian victory over the town. If you head just below the entrance to La Alcazaba you will find the ruins of an ancient amphitheatre dating back to the second century AD.

The Cathedral – Malaga’s Cathedral also called “La Manquita” (one armed woman) due to only one completed tower, was built between 1528 and 1782.

Museo de Artes Populares – This arts and crafts museum features items used between the 17th and 20th centuries and other worthy pieces. On display are ceramic figures, clay figures, folk costumes, fishing equipment, furniture, horse-drawn carriages, and more.

Santiago Church – The foundation of this church dates back to July 25, 1490 making it the oldest church in Malaga.malaga-catedral Pablo Picasso was baptized here in 1881. Major points of interest include the Mudejar Tower, sculptural works, and pictorial works.

Gibralfaro Castle – Gibralfaro Castle/Fortress offers some of the most amazing panoramic views the city has to offer. This is the original place where Gibralfro lies and it is located next to La Alcazaba.

Finca La Concepcion – Considered one of the most important and the most beautiful botanical gardens in Europe, this 150-year-old botanical garden features giant ficus, araucarias (one 147-foot-tall specimen is the tallest tree in the province, palms, cycads, bamboo from China, and a wide variety of exotic flowers.

Town Hall – Town Hall is the most fascinating modernistic structure in Malaga. It was built between 1912 and 1919 andTown hall Malaga it features a neo-baroque style, gorgeous gardens, and excellent views of Alcazaba and Gibralfaro.

And here are a handful of other – fairly personal – reasons to visit Malaga.

Because it’s not Sevilla, Granada or Córdoba…

Don’t get me wrong, magnificent cities all. And Malaga certainly has nothing to compare with Granada’s Alhambra, Cordoba’s Mezquita, or Seville’s Barrio de Santa Cruz or Alcazar. But with outstanding beauty and history – and the inevitable tourists they bring – can come a certain self-consciousness. One of the things that makes Malaga stand out is its relaxed charm; as if it knows that its flashy neighbours are going to grab all the attention, but that it’s not really all that bothered about it.

Because of the fried fish…

Locals are known as boquerones – and anchovies there are aplenty. Along with dogfish, cod, haddock, and the king of fried ocean dwellers, puntillitas (or baby squid). Out to the east in the lively suburb of El Palo, El Tintero is the place to go to shout out your order and have a plate of mixed fried fish slung in front of you by a hassled waiter in a grease-spattered white shirt. If that’s your kind of thing.

For a time, though, my favourite spot used to be down a little alley to the north of the Alameda Principal (it’s easy enoughmalaga_fried-fish to find), where I’d slip off and eat hot fistfuls of fried baby squid while standing ankle deep in crumpled up napkins. All washed down with a couple of ice-cold beers or a glass of fino. Hardly fine dining, but one of the most satisfying gastronomic experiences of my life, nevertheless.

Because of the Atarazanas Market…

The Atarazanas Market is like a museum of foodstuff. If a museum were run by large, bellowing fishwives bearing meat cleavers, that is. It’s not for the squeamish (as so many things involving food/animals in Spain tend not to be) though, as sheep heads, skinned rabbits, pigs’ trotters and the like dangle in front of your eyes. If the noise, the scrum and the sights and smells get a bit much, there’s a handsome and largely original Moorish gate to inspect out front.

Because of (or in spite of Picasso…

Bloody Picasso. He’s done more from the grave to make people visit Malaga than anyone alive. The great man once said: “When I was a child I could paint like Raphael; it look me a long time to learn to paint like a child again.” There’s nothing childlike about the Museo Picasso; it’s a proper grownup museum in a lovely old palace. A tip, though: the Contemporary Arts Centre (CAC) is arguably just as interesting. And nobody really bothers to go there.

Because of El Pimpi…

An institution. And in fairness, El Pimpi’s been working harder for longer than most places in Malaga to draw in theMalaga's nicest tapas bar El Pimpi visitors. It is an outrageously picturesque bar: a sprawling warren of colourful tiles, plant-festooned patios, barrels… and photographs. Lots and lots of photographs. For every sepia-tinted bullfighter, former dictator’s daughter, 70s Spanish singer and obscure celebrity of yesteryear, every now and again a leering Antonio Banderas will jump out at you.

Because of Malaga wine…

The Victorians knew when they were on to a good thing. But since then, dessert wines have tended to be sniffed at by the wineoscenti. While it’s obviously no sherry (or Ribeira, Rioja or Albariño…), this sweet, faintly medicinal concoction of Moscatel and Pedro Ximenez grapes has always been liberally swilled in its hometown, where it goes down nicely with, well, pretty much everything. At its best on cool, damp winter evenings.

Because of the people…

Malagueños are great. Seriously. In a region of a country where people define themselves first and foremost in relation to their pueblo, changes in personality can be quite marked from place to place. And Malaga is just about the friendliest city in the south of Spain. Which probably makes it one of the friendliest places in Europe by anyone’s reckoning.

Because of the sun…

There, I’ve said it. Because of the sun. And if citing the weather as a reason for loving a place is dangerously close to

why all too many incurious expats have made their home in the strip of concrete running away to the west of the city, it’s pretty hard to deny: one of Malaga’s chief attractions is its climate. Because there really are few things that can beat sitting out and watching the world go by (in no particular hurry, as a general rule) on a gorgeous February afternoon. One of the best spots for a bit of mid-afternoon sunning is the row of pavement cafes that line the north side of the Plaza Merced; here, bohemian hangout Café con Libros rises above the rest for its freshly made fruit juices and smoothies.

Because in Málaga you can learn or improve your Spanish…

Malaga, with all its charms and cultural gems, sees thousands of students that come to learn the language. Malaga is home to one of the key Spanish language teaching infrastructures. It is a great place not only to learn the language but also the culture. Malaga, even as it is a thoroughly modern city, has managed to maintain its unique Spanish culture (as well as that of its past inhabitants –the Greeks, the Romans and the Moors just to name a few). For more information on taking a Spanish course in Malaga visit the site Alhambra Instituto one of the best Spanish schools for foreigners in Spain…

Because of the flower ladies on the Alameda Principal…

It’s not exactly one of the world’s great flower markets; in actual fact there are only a handful of vendors. But clustered

around their booths in the shade of the ancient ficus trees with their colourful wares laid out around them, they make for a pleasing sight. The early evening is the best time to head down there. When you’re done – it won’t take long – you can always drop into the Antigua Casa Guardia (a 160-year-old bar), for a fortifying something or other in traditional spit and sawdust surroundings.

Because it doesn’t have too many world-beating hotels…

Tired old hostales there are plenty. Backpackers’ hostels, more than a couple. But good luxury hotels in Malaga are a little thin on the ground. And who’s to say that’s not necessarily a good thing? Because if there were lots more great hotels, then hordes more tourists would probably come to visit Malaga. And that would never do. Foreing students live in Spanish families or saring a flat of 3 or 4 bedrooms.

Because you change and it stays the same…

It’s very hard to pin down the essence of a metropolis, endlessly shifting as they tend to be, like litter stirred up by a gust of wind. But in small(ish) cities like Malaga the character of the place stays more or less the same. It’s changed precious little in the years I’ve been visiting it – a little richer and a bit more polished maybe. But I suspect it will always be more or less the same.

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